“A Table!” Lessons in Expat Cooking – Céleri Rémoulade

You don’t have to cook fancy or complicated masterpieces – just good food from fresh ingredients.

– Julia Child

When I first arrived in France, I had a pretty solid background in cooking. I was a fan of a wide array of foods and wasn’t what one would consider ‘fussy’ when it came to eating. Thank you, Paris, for ruining that! OK, OK that isn’t 100% accurate but it is based in a lot of truth. So many things taste inherently better here and for that I bring your attention back to the Julia Child quote above.  Like Ms. Child, I strongly believe that meals made with real, quality, fresh ingredients taste much better than those made from what I like to call Frankenfoods – foods dreamt up by chemists, not Mother Nature.

After my son was born, I quickly enrolled in a programme that brings you a different mixed organic panier (basket) of fresh fruits and vegetables every week. I registered our family for the 7kg box and delighted each week in picking up the panier and discovering what was inside. No two baskets were ever the same as the contents were all farm-fresh and based on seasonal availabilities. It is here where I received my first céleri-rave (celeriac) and boy did that throw me for a curve! I was quite honestly stumped by this knobby, white-ish, brown-ish, lumpy ball in my basket. I had to resort to Google to figure out what it was as the paniers never came with a list, just a box full of surprises that Forrest Gump’s mama would have been proud of. Somehow the search results didn’t help me understand this crazy little root vegetable any better.

So there I was, a celeriac in hand and no idea what to do with it. Many recipes online suggested to try making it into something that resembled mashed potatoes. That is what I did and having tried it,  I do not recommend it. First, little miss celeriac-novice here must have totally screwed up because I basically made mush, not mash. Second, I have discovered celeriac is SO MUCH BETTER and is worthy of dignified recipes that reach far beyond the depths of mash.

On one particular night out, Mr H and I went to this amazing little historic brasserie called Le Stella. Listed on the entrées menu (appetisers) was this curious-sounding dish called Céleri Rémoulade. It was described as an egg, celeriac and dijon mustard salad. Intrigued by the celeriac I had so clearly failed with before, I gave it a chance. That was about 6 years ago and I’ve been giving it a chance ever since! To say I fell in love with céleri rémoulade is an understatement. It is very basic but works so well on so many levels. Serve it as a side dish, a salad, an appetiser, etc. This isn’t complicated cooking but it IS well-worth it! I have tried several recipes/versions over the years and this is my particular blend and obviously my favourite!

Céleri Rémoulade

Serving sizes are hard to determine based on what you will be using this for but the good news is this makes a lot and lasts for several days in the fridge!

  • One celeriac
  • 2 egg yolks** (3 if your celeriac is large)
  • 250ml/1 cup quality extra virgin olive oil
  • 1-2 tablespoons/15-30ml of quality dijon mustard (more or less if you prefer – also use more if your celeriac is large)
  • vinegar
  • lemon
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions:

Start with the best ingredients your budget allows for. A quality mustard and oil will taste so much better and really enhance the flavour of this dish.  You will need to peel your celeriac. For this I like to cut it in half to create flat surfaces then slowly cut the outer peel off with a sharp knife. Take your time doing this if you are a kitchen newbie.

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Gather all your ingredients together before you start, makes it less stressful and you won’t have a shock 3/4 of the way through that you are out of something!
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Carefully cut the celeriac in half to create flat surfaces for peeling.

Next peel your celeriac and then, if you are using a hand grater, begin to grate. If you have  food processor,  into smaller chunks that will easily grate.

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Cutting into smaller, more manageable pieces makes it easier for your food processor to handle.
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Weeeee!!!!!

Set aside your grated celeriac for a couple minutes. You can, if you want, toss in some lemon juice to stop from browning but if you work fast enough, that isn’t necessary.

You might notice at this point the sauce you are making is like a dijon-heavy, lemon-y mayonnaise. You would be correct. If the idea of using raw eggs scares you or you are too afraid to make your mayonnaise, you CAN use a store-bought version. Please make sure it is real, quality mayo and not something with the word “Whip” in the name! Substitute the mayo (about 250ml/1 cup) for the egg and oil, add the rest of the ingredients.

Begin by separating your eggs and adding the yolks to a bowl big enough to whisk in (don’t toss the egg whites out, you can store them in the fridge and add to an omelette, etc.). Add the dijon mustard, salt and pepper and start to whisk. Now, slowly, and I do mean slowly,begin to add the olive oil by drizzling in while you continue to whisk. Keep going until all the oil has been added. At this point, I squeeze in a lemon wedge or two to add some liquid and thin it out a bit. If I am I craving an acidic taste, I will also add about a teaspoon (5ml) of white vinegar. If necessary, add more salt and pepper to taste. You want a creamy, mayonnaise-like texture. Fluffy and creamy. Those are your keywords.

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Egg yolks and dijon
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Slowly add the olive oil by drizzling in while you whisk.
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Adding a touch of vinegar gives the sauce/mayonnaise a slightly more acidic taste that I happen to love!

All that is left to do at this point is mix the celeriac and sauce, then place in the refrigerator for a couple of hours to marinade. Serve with salad greens, tomatoes, parsley, you name it. This is a versatile and yummy side dish or appetiser that will please you way more than celeriac mush. I promise!!

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Mix, mix, mix!! I add small amounts of celeriac at a time. This way I don’t run out of sauce vs. how much celeriac I grated. You can always add more, you can’t take away!!!
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Mixed and ready to chill!
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Enjoy!!

**PLEASE NOTE: I am compelled to remind you that choosing to eat raw egg yolks is just that, YOUR choice. As a blogger, I am not responsible for your choice and assume no subsequent liability.

Photos: Jennifer Hart, Fotolia

Author: Jennifer Hart

Traveller. Wife. Mother. Bilingual. Hiker. Shopper. Skier. Snowboarder. Soccer midfielder. Marathoner. Canadian. Wine lover. Mama also to a crazy labrador retriever. My running keeps me grounded. My writing keeps me sane. My kids and husband keep me loved. These are our stories, love them or leave them. We may not have a permanent home but we have each other.

4 thoughts on ““A Table!” Lessons in Expat Cooking – Céleri Rémoulade”

    1. Thanks!! I love it (now), too!! I admit, the look of it had me a bit scared at first but I’m SOOO glad I gave it a try!! Feel free to share the post/recipe to encourage others 🙂

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      1. Thanks, I’ll share with my European and Australian based friends. I live in Viet Nam, so there isn’t much celeriac available to me. Taro is my ugly vegetable of choice here.

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